Computing Community Consortium Blog

The goal of the Computing Community Consortium (CCC) is to catalyze the computing research community to debate longer range, more audacious research challenges; to build consensus around research visions; to evolve the most promising visions toward clearly defined initiatives; and to work with the funding organizations to move challenges and visions toward funding initiatives. The purpose of this blog is to provide a more immediate, online mechanism for dissemination of visioning concepts and community discussion/debate about them.


New Data Sets from the Next Generation Simulation (NGSIM) Program are Now Available in the Research Data Exchange

May 25th, 2016 / in Announcements, research horizons, Research News / by Helen Wright

Screen Shot 2016-05-25 at 1.14.58 PMThe Research Data Exchange (RDE) is a web-based data resource provided by the USDOT Intelligent Transportation Systems (ITS) Program. It collects, manages, and provides access to archived and real-time multi-source and multi-modal data to support the development and testing of ITS applications.

The RDE now houses four data sets from the Next Generation Simulation (NGSIM) Program. The NGSIM program was initiated by the United States Department of Transportation (USDOT) Federal Highway Administration (FHWA) to develop traveler behavioral algorithms that could be used in microscopic traffic simulation models. The validated data sets and documentation describing these algorithms which replicated the interactions of multimodal travelers, vehicles and highway systems (e.g., traffic control devices, delineation, congestion, and other features of the environment). NGSIM stakeholder groups identified the collection of real-world vehicle trajectory data as important to understanding and researching driver behavior. The NGSIM effort supports the development of algorithms for driver behavior at microscopic levels. The four locations of data simulation include:

Lankershim Boulevard, Los Angeles, CA

Vehicle trajectory data was collected on Lankershim Boulevard in the Universal City neighborhood of Los Angeles, CA in June 2005. The study area consisted of a bidirectional three to four lane arterial and three signalized intersections, was approximately 500 meters (1,600 feet) in length. Five video cameras mounted on the roof of a 36-story building located adjacent to the U.S. Highway 101 and Lankershim Boulevard interchange recorded vehicles passing through the study area. Vehicle trajectory data was then transcribed from the video using NG-VIDEO, a customized software application developed for the NGSIM program.

US-101, Los Angeles, CA

Vehicle trajectory data was collected on southbound US 101, also known as the Hollywood Freeway, in Los Angeles, CA in June 2005. The study area was approximately 640 meters (2,100 feet) in length and consisted of five mainline lanes throughout the section. An auxiliary lane is present through a portion of the corridor between the on-ramp at Ventura Boulevard and the off-ramp at Cahuenga Boulevard. Eight synchronized digital video cameras, mounted from the top of a 36-story building adjacent to the freeway, recorded vehicles passing through the study area. Vehicle trajectory data was then transcribed from the video using NG-VIDEO, a customized software application developed for the NGSIM program.

I-80, Emeryville, CA

Vehicle trajectory data was collected on eastbound I-80 in the San Francisco Bay area in Emeryville, CA in April 2005. The study area was approximately 500 meters (1,640 feet) in length and consisted of six freeway lanes, including a high-occupancy vehicle (HOV) lane. An onramp also was located within the study area. Seven synchronized digital video cameras, mounted from the top of a 30-story building adjacent to the freeway, recorded vehicles passing through the study area. Vehicle trajectory data was then transcribed from the video using NG-VIDEO, a customized software application developed for the NGSIM program.

Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, GA

Vehicle trajectory data was collected on an arterial segment on Peachtree Street in Atlanta, GA in November 2006. This data was collected using eight video cameras mounted on a 30-story building, which is located at 1100 Peachtree Street NE, Atlanta, GA. Vehicle trajectory data was then transcribed from the video using NG-VIDEO, a customized software application developed for the NGSIM program.

Researchers, application developers, and others are invited to visit the RDE website to explore how they may use the available data and resources.

For more information, please contact Jon Obenberger at jon.obenberger@dot.gov.

New Data Sets from the Next Generation Simulation (NGSIM) Program are Now Available in the Research Data Exchange